1988: PAST MASTERS. Double compilation-LP 

  

Double-LP-edition which collects the two CD's Past Masters vol 1 and Past Masters Vol.2

Parlophone/October 24, 1988

Produced by George Martin

LP 1, side 1: 
Love Me Do (single version)
From Me To You
Thank You Girl
She Loves You
I'll Get You
I Want To Hold Your Hand
This Boy
Komm, Gib Mir Deine Hand
Sie Liebt Dich
Long Tall Sally
I Call Your Name

LP1, side 2:

Slow Down 
Matchbox 
I Feel Fine 
She's A Woman 
Bad Boy 
Yes It Is 
I'm Down

LP2, side 1:

Day Tripper
We Can Work It Out
Paperback Writer
Rain
Lady Madonna
The Inner Light
Hey Jude
Revolution
Get Back (single version)

LP2, side 2:

Don't Let Me Down 
The Ballad Of John And Yoko 
Old Brown Shoe 
Across The Universe (Wildlife version) 
Let It Be (single version) 
You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)

These collection-CD's brought the Beatles on CD up to date with all the miscellaneous tracks that weren't on the other CD's. Beatles-expert Mark Lewisohn put together these two CD's from singles a- and b-sides, ep's etc. There are some songs here that are in different versions than on other CD's. The double - LP is just the two CD's combined. The CD's are depicted below.

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Love Me Do (version 1) (mono)
Ringo Starr: drums
basic recording- 4 Sep 1962
additional recording- 4 Sep 1962
master tape- twintrack 2d generation (no longer exists)
mono-mixed: 4 Sep 1962 Re-mixed from original vinyl singles in 1978 and 1982

Ringo drumming, no tambourine (see the Please Please Me LP). EMI practice at this time was not to keep the session master once mixing was complete, and in this case the mono mix master tape was lost by the end of 1962 and replaced by the Please Please me album version on all further releases. When issuing the "Ringo"-version on "Rarities" in 1978, an original vinyl single was used as a source.  In 1982, an even better original vinyl single was made available to EMI by a collector. This is the version used here, in de-clicked form. The de-clicking process did however produce a slight distortion of the harmonica, which means that perhaps some day we will get an even better sounding mix of this version of the song.

From Me To You (mono)

basic recording- 5 Mar 1963
additional recording- 5 Mar 1963
master tape- twintrack 2d generation
mono mixed: 14 Mar 1963
stereo mixed: 14 Mar 1963 Digitally remixed in 2000 for "1"

The stereo mix is not available on CD, but can be found on "A Collection of Beatles Oldies", and misses the harmonica in the intro.

 
Thank You Girl (mono)

basic recording- 5 Mar 1963
additional recording- 5,13 Mar 1963
master tape- twintrack 2d generation
mono mixed: 13 Mar 1963
stereo mixed: 13 Mar 1963 

Stereo (Only available on vinyl:The Beatles' Second Album in the USA and Beatles Beat in Germany) has harmonica edit pieces in the middle and at the end that were not used for mono (this version), and has more echo. Unlike From Me to You, the harmonica was mixed into only the vocal track. The stereo mix has a lot of echo on it, which was probably an addition by Capitol. 

She Loves You (mono)

basic recording- 1 Jul 1963
additional recording- 1 Jul 1963
master tape- twintrack 2d generation [lost]
mono mixed: 4 Jul 1963. edited. Restored in 1992 Digitally remixed in 2000 for "1"

A sonic restoration by Peter Mew, made originally for the CD EP set in 1992, sounds much better than this version and is easiest obtained on 1962-1966 (aka. "The red album") double CD-set.

I'll Get You (mono)

basic recording- 1 Jul 1963
additional recording- 1 Jul 1963
master tape- twintrack 2d generation [lost]
mono mixed: 4 Jul 1963. edited

I Want To Hold Your Hand (stereo)

basic recording- 17 Oct 1963
additional recording- 17 Oct 1963
master tape- 4 track
mono mixed: 21 Oct 1963
stereo mixed: 7 Nov 1966 for "A Collection of Beatles Oldies". Digitally remixed in 2000 for "1"

An earlier stereo mix was made on 8 Jun 1965, and was used for some german LP releases, such as Beatles Beat, and Beatles Greatest 65, as well as a 1965 australian compilation and the dutch Beatles Greatest from 1967. This mix had the lead guitar louder and the handclaps slightly louder, and somewhat more bass sound. En even earlier stereo mix, made by George Martin exists from 21 Oct 1963, and surfaced briefly on an australian reissue of the single in 1976. It has the rhythm instruments far left and vocal far right, like a twintrack mix, leaving the lead guitar isolated in the center, which sounds odd since it only plays fills. Surely sending this master to Australia was an accident.

This Boy (stereo)

basic recording- 17 Oct 1963
additional recording- 17 Oct 1963
master tape- 4 track
mono mixed: 21 Oct 1963. edited.
stereo mixed: 21 Oct 1963. edited. 

The edit removed an instrumental break after the bridge, leaving an abrupt transition to the last verse.

The stereo mix of "This Boy" first appeared on a canadian B-side in 1976, but wasn't made widely available until it appeared on a UK EP in 1981, and then on this release. Lewisohn reports of a 1966 stereo remix, but this mix has yet to surface. 

Komm, Gib Mir Deine Hand (mono)

basic recording- 17 Oct 1963
additional recording- 29 Jan 1964 at EMI Pathe Marconi, Paris
master tape- twin-track 3d generation (?)
mono mixed: 29 Jan 1964(?) edited. Re-mixed for mono 10 Mar 1964
stereo mixed: 12 Mar 1964. edited.

This is a new vocal dubbed onto a copy of the instrumental tracks of I want to hold your hand from October 17. The edit on all mixes is unspecified but it joins two takes of the German vocal and handclap track.

Talk ("coming"?) and at the start of the stereo mix [c] is partly cut off on Parlophone's Rarities but it's still there.

The first mono mix, not in Lewisohn, is required by German single 22 671 being released on 4 Feb 1964, according to Moers as supported by the catalog number. If a mix was made in Paris on 29 Jan and shipped directly to Odeon, it might have escaped EMI's book keeping and thus also Lewisohn's research. The mixes of March seem to be for the album Komm, Gib Mir Deine Hand on Electrola, and were then used for any other releases. That album was a collection of songs by various artists, issued probably March 1964. It contained two Beatles songs, the title and She loves you (not Sie Liebt Dich!).

Sie Liebt Dich (mono)

basic recording- 29 Jan 1964 at EMI Pathe Marconi, Paris
additional recording- 29 Jan 1964 at EMI Pathe Marconi, Paris
master tape- twintrack 2d generation (?)
mono mixed: 29 Jan 1964(?) edited. Re-mixed for mono 10 Mar 1964
stereo mixed: 12 Mar 1964. edited.

The master tapes of She Loves You being missing already, this is an all new recording (unlike Komm Gib Mir Deine Hand), but they may have been listening to playback of the record She Loves You.

The mono mix of January 29, not in Lewisohn, is required by the song being on the single O 22 671 of 4 February 1964 (see Komm, Gib Mir Deine Hand, above).

Long Tall Sally (stereo)

basic recording- 1 Mar 1964
additional recording- none
master tape- 4 track
mono mixed: 4 Jun 1964
stereo mixed: 22 Jun 1964

The stereo mix found here first appeared on the Australian "Greatest Hits 1" LP in 1966. An earlier stereo mix (10 Mar 1964) had the vocal on the right channel, not centered like here. The early mix can be found on the US stereo "Second Album" as well as the canadian stereo Long Tall Sally LP. The US mono "Second Album" did not have added echo to the track, unlike the UK mono releases.

I Call Your Name (stereo)

basic recording- 2 Mar 1964
additional recording- 2 Mar 1964
master tape- 4 track
mono mixed: 4 Jun 1964 (4 Mar for USA)
stereo mixed: 22 Jun 1964 (10 Mar for the USA)

All versions have edits, but different edits. The take (7) used for the main part of the song has a cowbell track that distinguishes it from other takes. The cowbell track is itself mixed more or less loudly. Take 7 also has a double track vocal.

Both stereo mixes (UK and USA) have a different, better guitar intro edited in, but done differently, so there are three versions of the intro. In the original intro as heard in mono, the cowbell starts right away. The USA stereo mix with the better guitar intro has no cowbell until the edit, which comes just before the vocal starts. In the UK stereo mix, the edit comes after the first line ("I call your name, but you're not there"), so it has neither cowbell nor the second vocal track until that point.

A second, obvious stereo difference is that the USA stereo mix has the vocal over on the right while the UK one has the vocal and cowbell centered.

All mixes have an edit for the guitar solo, but the edit into the solo comes at two different places. In the USA mono mix and the UK stereo mix it comes after the vocal, evidenced by the cowbell through the words "I call your name", but in the other two it comes just before that last line of vocal. The edit at the end of the solo is at the same place but there are slight variations in how well it was done.

Slow Down (stereo)

basic recording- 1 Jun 1964
additional recording- 1,4 Jun 1964
master tape- 4 track
mono mixed: 1 Jun 1964 
stereo mixed: 22 Jun 1964 

Stereo has the vocal and piano much louder (or one might say the rest is softer), and a cry "ow" is heard only in stereo just before the guitar at the end.

The vocal has a doubletracking error at what should be "now you got a boyfriend down the street" in verse 2. This is heard less distinctly in mono, as if the bad track were mixed down at that point, but it is there, marking it as the same vocal and not different as reported elsewhere. The bad vocal track seems to have "girlfriend" for "boyfriend"-- however, on the BBC radio version (11 months earlier than this EMI recording) John sings "now you don't care a dime for me", which is possibly what is here too.

Matchbox (stereo)

basic recording- 1 Jun 1964
additional recording- 1 Jun 1964
master tape- 4 track
mono mixed: 1 Jun 1964 
stereo mixed: 22 Jun 1964 

This has generous reverb on the vocal, and stereo has more than mono. Ringo sings the last word of "your puppy dog runs" indistinctly in mono, but that is corrected by an edit or overdub in stereo. The guitar solo ends differently so at least one of the two has an edit there.

I Feel Fine (stereo)

basic recording- 18 Oct 1964
additional recording- none
master tape- 4  track
mono mixed: 21 Oct 1964 
stereo mixed: 4 Nov 1964 Digitally remixed in 2000 for "1"

On the original UK "1962-1966 (aka "The red album), the song starts with a second or so of whispering and tapping before the usual opening. This has been trimmed off other stereo releases. German mock stereo (Beatles Greatest 65) actually fades a little longer, and is the longest fade of any mix.

She's A Woman (stereo)

basic recording- 8 Oct 1964
additional recording- 8 Oct 1964
master tape- 4  track
mono mixed: 12 Oct 1964 
stereo mixed: 12 Oct 1964 

The stereo-mix seems to have gone missing in the vaults for a while after being copied for Australia in 1967, as it was not used for the Parlophone Rarities LP, but it was found for the CD release. Another version made it to the extra EP in the boxed set in 1981, it is the same stereo mix but with a countdown at the start, added from a master reel.

Bad Boy (stereo)

basic recording- 10 May 1965
additional recording- none
master tape- 4 track 
mono mixed: 10 May 1964
stereo mixed: 10 May 1964,

 

The mono mix has has bass and drums mixed louder. 

Yes It Is (stereo)

basic recording- 16 Feb 1965
additional recording- 16 Feb 1965
master tape- 4 track 
mono mixed: 18 Feb 1965
stereo mixed: 23 Feb 1965

The stereo-mix seems to have gone missing in the vaults for a while, as it was not used for later releases on stereo LP's of this track (Rarities and Love Songs contained mock-stereo remixes of the mono mix). It finally reappeared when the beer company Heineken released a promotional cassette in 1986, entitled "Only The Beatles". It has a dropout (a tape defect) in verse 1 on the word "I" in "remember what I said tonight", and an extra tone-pedal note under the first word "if".

I'm Down (stereo)

basic recording- 14 Jun 1965
additional recording- 14 Jun 1965
master tape- 4 track 
mono mixed: 18 June 1965
stereo mixed: 18 June 1965

During the guitar break in stereo, a second, different lead guitar can just be heard as a leak or echo on the mostly silent right channel. 

Day Tripper (stereo)

 

basic recording- 16 Oct 1965
additional recording- 16 Oct 1965
master tape- 4 track 
mono mixed: 29 Oct 1965
stereo mixed: 10 Nov 1966, Early USA stereo mix made 26 Oct 1965. Digitally remixed in 2000 for "1"

 

The two early stereo mixes differ noticeably. The lead guitar intro in the 1965-mix starts left and jumps to the right when the other instruments come in; in 1966 it starts in both channels instead, apparently by ADT (artificial double tracking). As the ending begins, after the first "day tripper!", the 1965-mix reveals an off-mike "yeah" by John, while the 1966-mix has a partially successful attempt to fade out the word.

On both the early stereo mixes, the lead guitar track suddenly goes silent twice around 1:50-1:55, to cover a tape or recording problem. The first spot is after the first "tried to please her" line, where, with no vocal, one side of the mix just goes dead silent, and the second spot is under the second "tried to please her". A bootleg of the whole take reveals a squeaky tape noise at the first spot and some problem with the guitar sound for more than 10 seconds thereafter (possibly this section is a drop-in, recorded over the original sound on the track). The mono mix and the 2000-mix has this all fixed somehow; there the guitar may have been dubbed in from another verse or take.

We Can Work It Out (stereo)

basic recording- 20 Oct 1965
additional recording- 20,29 Oct 1965
master tape- 4 track
mono mixed: 29 Oct 1965
stereo mixed: 10 Nov 1965, remixed 10 Nov 1966 for "A Collection of Beatles Oldies"

In stereo (1965), the harmonium is moved around: it's to the right during the verses, but to center during the refrains and bridges, and it even drifts to the right in mid-bridge ("fussing and fighting") and end of bridge. By contrast, in the remix (1966) it just stays to the right. But then again, at the very end, the 1965-mix reveals there are two harmonium tracks. The 1966-mix has reverb added to the vocals in places, especially the bridge. The earliest stereo mix can be found on the USA "Yesterday... and Today" LP.

Paperback Writer (stereo)

basic recording- 13 Apr 1966
additional recording- 13,14 Apr 1966
master tape- 4 track
mono mixed: 14 Apr 1966
stereo mixed: 31 Oct 1966 (2 different mixes) Digitally remixed in 2000 for "1"

The mono mix is more powerful, with louder drums and a compressed dynamic range. Ringo's drum tapping during the a capella "paperback writer" can be heard a little in mono, fading up a few taps before the guitars come back in. The backup vocal track is unusually "dirty", and in stereo unintended sound can be heard at a few points-- particularly, before the last "paperback writer" (about 1:45), a hrrmph and then very quiet tries at the right note (earlier in the song, a miscue starting the second group of "Frere Jacques" is noticeable even in mono). Mono has more echo, notably a long "write write write" after the last verse. Lastly, the mono mix fades later, after the 6th "paperback writer" instead of near the start of the 5th one.
There were three stereo mixes made the same day, and two of them have been released. The obvious difference is that left-right is reversed, and the only other difference noted is that one of them (on the USA releases "Hey Jude" (1970) and "1962-1966" (1973) has the backing vocals a little louder. It could be they are the same mix with both stereo reversal and a slight change in balance that makes the side with the backup vocals louder.

Rain (stereo)

basic recording- 14 Apr 1966
additional recording- 14,16 Apr 1966
master tape- 4 track 2d generation
mono mixed: 16 Apr 1966
stereo mixed: 2 Dec 1969 (for the USA compilation LP "Hey Jude" (or "The Beatles Again")

The master tape has backwards vocals at the end, overdubbed from another take -- the backwards line has "when the rain comes", but this take, forwards, has "if the rain comes".

Lady Madonna (stereo)

basic recording- 3 Feb 1968
additional recording- 3,6 Feb 1968
master tape- 4 track 3d generation
mono-mixed: 15 Feb 1968.
stereo-mixed: 2 Dec 1969. A new, different mix was done for the "Anthology 2" CD set in 1995. Digitally remixed in 2000 for "1"

The decay on the last piano note is cut off on both mixes but lasts longer in mono.
The Anthology mix is deliberately different. All the basic tracks of 3 tape generations are synchronized and remixed with drums, bass and sax mixed down or out. There is a sound in the decay of the last note that, if it is in the piano track, explains why that's cut short in the regular stereo and mono mixes. 

The Inner Light (stereo)

basic recording- 12 Jan 1968 at EMI Bombay, India
additional recording- 6,8 Feb 1968
master tape- 4 track 2d generation
mono-mixed: 8 Feb 1968.
stereo-mixed: 27 Jan 1970.

The stereo mix sat unused for a long time, they didn't use it until the EP boxed set in 1981!
During the opening instrumental section, a mystery instrument that may be a shehnai is different and better in mono: in its first section, it is stronger, lasts longer, and rises at the end, where in stereo it is less complex and trails off. If the mono version is using some sort of edit piece or overdub, which seems likely, they missed it when doing the stereo mix two years later. 

Hey Jude (stereo)

basic recording- 31 Jul 1968 at Trident studios
additional recording- 31 Jul, 1 Aug 1968 at Trident studios
master tape- 8 track
mono-mixed: 8 Aug 1968.
stereo-mixed: 5 Dec 1969 Digitally remixed in 2000 for "1"

Drums are mixed louder in stereo. Mono is 5 seconds longer than the longest appearance of the stereo mix, long fade. This song has appeared with early fades on some compilations (in stereo).

Revolution (single version, but stereo)

basic recording- 10 Jul 1968
additional recording- 10,11,12 Jul 1968
master tape- 4 track 4th generation
mono-mixed: 15 Jul 1968.
stereo-mixed: 5 Dec 1969.

The song was deliberately distorted during recording and mixing, so since the mono [a] sounds more distorted and compressed, it's better! John's guitar also sounds louder in mono. You'll find the mono version on the single (the CD-single too).

Get Back (single version) (stereo)

Digitally remixed in 2000 for "1"

Don't Let Me Down  (stereo)

The Ballad Of John And Yoko (stereo)

Digitally remixed in 2000 for "1"

Old Brown Shoe (stereo)

Across The Universe (Wildlife version) (stereo)

basic recording- 4 Feb 1968
additional recording- 4,8 Feb 1968, 1 Apr 1970
master tape- 4 track 2d generation
stereo-mixed: 2 Oct 1969 (version 1), remixed by Phil Spector (version 2) 2 Apr 1970.

Neither of these is at the recorded speed; the old mix (version 1) is faster and the new mix (version 2) is slower than the original tape. The finished mono mix made in Feb 1968 has never been issued. Version 1 has animal sounds overdubbed during mixing for SRS 5013, a benefit album for the World Wildlife Fund. Version 2 has most of the original instrumentation mixed out and replaced by new orchestra and choral vocals recorded in 1970.  

Let It Be (single version) (stereo)

Digitally remixed in 2000 for "1"

You Know My Name (Look Up The Number) (mono)

basic recording- 17 May 1967 and 8 Jun 1967
additional recording- 17 May 1967 and 8 Jun 1967; 30 Apr 1969
master tape- 4 track 3d generation
Mono-mixed: 9 Jun 1967, 30 Apr, 26 Nov 1969. edited
Stereo-mixed: 1995. edited.

Recorded in 5 parts, part 1 on May 17 and the others on Jun 8, 1967; edited together Jun 9; all vocals (and some other sounds) added Apr 30, 1969; copied and edited Nov 26, 1969.
The deliberately different Anthology stereo mix shows the 5 parts clearly with the inclusion of part 2 (ska beat) that was cut entirely from mono, as well as a little bit of new material from part 3 (Slaggers). However almost half a minute of part 4 (high voices) heard in mono is missing in stereo, and the ending fades out just before the true ending heard in mono.

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