1999: YELLOW SUBMARINE SONGTRACK

Apple September 14. 1999 521 412 (released on yellow-coloured vinyl)

Side 1:

Yellow Submarine 
Hey Bulldog 
Eleanor Rigby 
Love You To 
All Together Now 
Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds 
Think For Yourself

Side 2:

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band 
With A Little Help From My Friends 
Baby, You're A Rich Man 
Only A Northern Song 
All You Need Is Love 
When I'm Sixty-Four 
Nowhere Man 
It's All Too Much
 


This compilation CD was released in 1999 in conjunction with the newly restored cartoon feature which was released theatrically as well as on VHS and DVD. All the songs were remastered and remixed from the original recordings, which updated the stereo picture of each song. Nothing was added, but a lot of sounds are made much clearer now. A must hear! On CD, you can program the Sgt. Pepper songs in the correct "Pepper" order to get a little taste of what that album could have sounded like, if it was made in 1999. Too bad they didn't include A Day In The Life on this LP/CD, as it's orchestral part was included in the cartoon feature. Perhaps they didn't dare?

Yellow Submarine

basic recording- 26 May 1966
additional recording- 26 May, 1 Jun 1966
master tape- 4 track 2d generation
mono-mixed: 3 Jun 1966
stereo-mixed: 22 Jun 1966, remixed in 1995 for "Anthology 2", remastered and remixed in 1999 for the "Yellow Submarine Songtrack" release.

The guitar comes in right away in mono but after "in the town" in original stereo. At the start of verse 3, a splash sound effect is faded away quickly in mono as the vocal starts, but continues over "and we live a life" in original stereo. John is heard repeating the vocal after the first line of verse 3 ("life of ease") in mono but not until the next line ("all we need") in the original stereo mix. The last line of verse 3 sounds like "in our yellow clubmarine" in mono but "slubmarine" in the original stereo mix. The official lyric is just "submarine".

The "Anthology 2"-mix is deliberately different, and starts by fading into an intro not used elsewhere before a hard edit to the standard version. The first guitar strum is missing as in original stereo. The mix inverts that mix by having the vocal and rhythm tracks centered, and the sound effects, including some not heard elsewhere, to the left and right and relatively louder. John's "life of ease" is heard in verse 3, and Ringo says "slubmarine".

Then 1999 comes along and paints a new picture of the song in vivid colours. It restores the "life of ease" vocal from John, which has always been missing in stereo. John's replies are also being panned across the stereo image from right to left, creating an effect that the submarine is sailing by us. The sound effects are also brought more to the fore on this version.

Hey Bulldog

basic recording- 11 Feb 1968
additional recording- 11 Feb 1968
master tape- 4 track
stereo-mixed: 29 Oct 1968
mono made from the stereo-mix 1968
remastered and remixed in 1999 for "Yellow Submarine Songtrack"

An 11 February 1968 mono mix was in the film print used at the London premiere of Yellow Submarine, but the song was then dropped from the film entirely. The version of the film with the song has occasionally appeared in the UK but is not the standard version there either. The 1989 video omitted the song once again, but the 1999 re-release of the film restored the "Hey Bulldog" section, in theaters as well as on VHS and DVD.

In 1999, the original multitrack tapes were resynched to make a brand new, "updated" stereo version of the song. Unfortunately, they haven't been able to center the drums, as they were stuck on the same tape as the piano, and they both remain in the left channel.  Ringo did overdub some extra snare beats though, which they have been able to center now.

Eleanor Rigby 

basic recording- 28 Apr 1966
additional recording- 29 Apr, 6 Jun 1966
master tape- 4 track 2d generation
mono-mixed: 22 Jun 1966. 
stereo-mixed: 22 Jun 1966, remixed in 1995 for "Anthology 2", remastered and remixed in 1999 for the "Yellow Submarine Songtrack" release.

The ADT (artificial doubletracking) in stereo (1966) continues into "Elean" in 1st verse, a really glaring mistake. The lead vocal, perhaps too prominent in both mono and stereo (1966), sounds stronger in mono. The "Anthology 2" mix omits the vocals, and remixes the string tracks. The 1999 stereo-remaster takes a beautiful song and makes it better. The strings are separated, like on the Anthology-mix, but here Paul's vocals are added, and we get the feeling he's sitting in the middle of the string octette.

Love You To

basic recording- 11 Apr 1966
additional recording- 11,13 Apr 1966
master tape- 4 track 2d generation
mono-mixed: 13 Apr 1966. edited
stereo-mixed: 21 Jun 1966, remastered and remixed in 1999 for the "Yellow Submarine Songtrack" release.

Mono has a much longer fade, by 13 seconds. The edit is of mixes with and without ADT, details not given in Lewisohn-- curiously both mixes are done that way. The 1999 remaster is another remasterpiece, and clearly the best mix yet. The fuzzy guitar is a lot clearer here. It didn't however, restore the 13 extra seconds from the mono mix.

All Together Now 

basic recording- 12 May 1967
additional recording- 12 May 1967
master tape- 4 track
stereo-mixed: 29 Oct 1968
mono made from the stereo-mix 1968
remastered and remixed in 1999 for "Yellow Submarine Songtrack"

A mono mix made 12 May 1967 was used only in the original Yellow Submarine film print. The 1999 remaster gives us the definitive stereo version of this song so far, bringing the backing vocals more to our attention.

Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds

basic recording- 1 Mar 1967
additional recording- 1,2 Mar 1967
master tape- 4 track 2d eneration
mono-mixed: 3 Mar 1967
stereo-mixed: 7 Apr 1967 and a different stereo mix was made in 1995 for "Anthology 2". Re-mastered and re-mixed again in 1999 for the "Yellow Submarine Songtrack"

The mono-mix has quite a bit of "phasing" not in stereo -- phasing is ADT with deliberate tape speed manipulation ("flanging") for a classic pyschedelic effect. Note especially the third "Lucy" line in the first refrain, but it continues, notable again in second refrain and in instrumental part leading to third refrain. Stereo sounds more natural but the mono mix evidently shows what was desired.

A new mono mix was made 1 November 1967 for the original Yellow Submarine film print with no vocal in the first part of the first verse, so an actor for the film could be dubbed in, and this also has less phasing.

The Anthology mix is deliberately different and sychronizes parts of an outtake with the standard take. It is take 6 (standard version is 7) with a tamboura from take 7 with harmony vocals in the chorus from the standard version take 8. There is no bass.

The Yellow Submarine Songtrack mix re-synchs the old multitracks again and takes us back to a cleaner version, John's vocals are glorious and Ringo's drumming leading to the chorus have a richer sound. 

Think For Yourself

basic recording- 8 Nov 1965
additional recording- 8 Nov 1965
master tape- 4 track
mono-mixed: 25 Oct 1965
stereo-mixed: 26 Oct 1965, Re-mixed for the Rubber Soul CD in 1987 and remastered for the Yellow Submarine Songtrack in 1999.

Again, the 1999 stereo remaster reigns supreme, with a much clearer "view" of the song. Especially George's lead vocal has benefitted enormously from the new mix.

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band 

basic recording- 1 Feb 1967
additional recording- 1,2 Feb, 3,6 Mar 1967
master tape- 4 track 2d generation
mono-mixed: 6 Mar 1967. crossfaded 6 Apr 1967
stereo-mixed: 6 Mar 1967. crossfaded 7 Apr 1967 Re-mastered and re-mixed again in 1999 for the "Yellow Submarine Songtrack"

The crossfade joins this song to With a Little Help From My Friends.

The lead guitar starting around "I don't really want to stop the show" is louder in mono, barely there in stereo. The crowd noise differs between the two and the crossfade is less well hidden in mono.

The Yellow Submarine Songtrack mix re-synchs the old multitracks again and brings us a cleaner version, this time in richer stereo than on the "Sgt. Pepper" LP. Paul's vocals and Ringo's drums are centered, while the backing vocals and the sound of the crowd has been moved about a bit.

With A Little Help From My Friends 

basic recording- 29 Mar 1967
additional recording- 29,30 Mar 1967
master tape- 4 track 3d generation
mono-mixed: 31 Mar 1967. crossfaded 6 Apr 1967
stereo-mixed: 7 Apr 1967. crossfaded 7 Apr 1967. Re-mastered and re-mixed again in 1999 for the "Yellow Submarine Songtrack"

The crossfade joins this to the preceding song, Sgt Pepper, but the songs do not overlap; rather, crowd noise runs from one through to the other. This song starts right before the announcement "Billy Shears!", which is more readily apparent as a change in ambience in mono, since louder crowd noise covers the join better in stereo.

The Yellow Submarine Songtrack mix re-synchs the old multitracks again and brings us a cleaner version, this time in richer stereo than on the "Sgt. Pepper" LP. Vocals and drums has especially benefitted from this mix.

Baby, You're A Rich Man

basic recording- 11 May 1967 at Olympic Sound
additional recording- 11 May 1967 at Olympic Sound
master tape- 4 track 2d generation
mono-mixed: 11 May 1967 at Olympic Sound.
stereo-mixed:  22 Oct 1971 at AIR.
remastered and remixed in 1999 for "Yellow Submarine Songtrack"

Mono is 9 seconds longer, long fade, compared to stereo. The deep bass is reproduced much better in stereo, but special effects are missing, such as the "spin" echo effect at pauses between lines such as after "eye can see", "enough to know", etc. 

Re-releases of the All You Need is Love/Baby You're A Rich Man - single (some Capitol 5964 issues and Capitol Starline A6300 from 1981) has the end of the word "seven" or "eleven" spoken just before the song starts. The USA "Magical Mystery Tour stereo LP had a mock-stereo version of the song, mixed from the mono version. The real stereo mix was released on the german "Magical Mystery Tour" LP from 1971 onwards. Inexplicably the UK release of the Magical Mystery Tour LP, delayed until 1976, used Capitol masters for the LP and German Odeon masters for the cassette, so the stereo version was available in the UK only on cassette.

In 1999, the original multitrack tapes were resynched to make a brand new, "updated" stereo version of the song. Vocals as well as drums are a lot clearer on this mix.

Only A Northern Song

basic recording- 13 Feb 1967
additional recording- 14 Feb, 20 Apr 1967
master tape- 4 track + 4 track 2d generation (2 tapes)
mono-mixed: 21 Apr 1967
stereo-mixed: 1995 for "Anthology 2" and remastered and remixed in 1999 for "Yellow Submarine Songtrack"

The first generation, take 3, was mixed down to take 12 and overdubs added; then tracks of take 3 were wiped and overdubs added. The mono mix is made from both synchronized, mainly from 12. No attempt was made to make stereo. The song was used in mono in the original film print of Yellow Submarine.

The Anthology mix is also synchronized from tracks on different original tapes, but deliberately has different tracks mixed in, including a different lead vocal; and it is speeded up just over 2 per cent for no stated reason.

The Yellow Submarine Songtrack mix again synchronizes the original multitracks, but this time they included only what was originally there, and for the first time we had a genuine glorious stereo version of the song.

All You Need Is Love

basic recording- 14 Jun 1967 at Olympic Sound
additional recording- 19,23,24,25,26 Jun 1967
master tape- 4 track 3d generation
mono-mixed: 26 June 1967 (used on the single, and the mono USA Magical Mystery Tour LP)
stereo-mixed: 29 Oct 1968
remastered and remixed in 1999 for "Yellow Submarine Songtrack"

In the intro, the mono version has more horns but less drums, and the piano heard in stereo is not audible. In the guitar solo, the lead guitar is louder in mono and has more flanging, but ends by being cut off awkwardly, while in stereo it fades down but can still be heard during the brass section. The mono version has a longer fade by 10 seconds so that Greensleeves is heard twice. In stereo a voice says "Check!" 25 seconds in.

A new mono mix made 1 November 1967 was used for original film prints of Yellow Submarine.

In 1999, the original multitrack tapes were resynched to make a brand new, "updated" stereo version of the song. The harpsichord in the opening loses a bit of it's original punch though, but the backing vocals are more wonderful than before.

The live television broadcast on June 25 1967, which has been bootlegged, has a tambourine instead of a drumroll at the opening, and a different lead vocal, and additionally parts of the backing tracks were heard before the performance.

When I'm Sixty-Four 

basic recording- 6 Dec 1966
additional recording- 6,8,20,21 Dec 1966
master tape- 4 track 2d generation
mono-mixed: 30 Dec 1966
stereo-mixed: 17 Apr 1967 Re-mastered and re-mixed again in 1999 for the "Yellow Submarine Songtrack"

The tape was speeded up when mixed. The Yellow Submarine Songtrack mix re-synchs the old multitracks again and takes us back to a cleaner version, the woodwinds have a fullrer sound and Paul sounds as if he's singing in your living room.

Nowhere Man 

basic recording- 22 Oct 1965
additional recording- 22 Oct 1965
master tape- 4 track
mono-mixed: 25 Oct 1965
stereo-mixed: 26 Oct 1965, Re-mixed for the Rubber Soul CD in 1987 and remastered for the Yellow Submarine Songtrack in 1999.

The original stereo mix has all sound either far left or far right. The 1987 CD mix has rhythm (drums, bass, rhythm guitar) at left center and only lead guitar at far left; the lead guitar moves to far right for solo as in 1965. The 1987 mix has John's lead vocal at right center and his second vocal with the others at far right. Then, in 1999, a completely different stereo picture was painted. The original multitrack source tapes  were synched up once again, to form a vastly superior new master. Vocals and instruments in both channels, forming the best and cleanest stereo image of this song so far.

It's All Too Much 

basic recording- 25 May 1967 at De Lane Lea
additional recording- 31 May, 2 Jun 1967 at De Lane Lea
master tape- 4 track 2d generation
stereo-mixed: 17 Oct 1968. edited
mono made from the stereo-mix 1968
remastered and remixed in 1999 for "Yellow Submarine Songtrack"

An excerpt of an 8:25 mono mix made 12 October 1967 was used only in original film prints of Yellow Submarine. The portion used includes a verse not included on the record. The additional material includes another verse and chorus (the original third chorus and fourth verse) and runs longer at the end. This has been bootlegged in mono.

In the stereo mix, most of the sound that is not placed center is placed using ADT to both left and right, so it sounds very dense.

In 1999, the original multitrack tapes were resynched to make a brand new, "updated" stereo version of the song. 

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